Введение

ВведениеIndian School 1891-1990

Только на Английский

2 Точки тура

  1. Информация о туре
  2. Информация о туре

    In 1890, the Federal Government purchased 160 acres of farmland from a local landowner for $9,000. Federal officials opened the Phoenix Indian School one year later. At its peak in 1935, 900 students attended the school. Among its most popular features were its marching band, which was a frequent participant in local and statewide festivals, and athletic program. The federal government closed the boarding school in 1990.*

    The city of Phoenix was able to obtain the land in 1996 through an intricate three-way land exchange involving the Baron Collier Company and the federal government.The park is named after Horace C. Steele. He founded the Steele Foundation in 1980 to fund charitable, educational, and scientific programs; primarily in Arizona. The Steele foundation donated $2.5 million dollars to start development of the park and in 1997 the Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board approved naming the Park for this successful businessman and philanthropist.The Park opened in November 2001.

    * Sources of historical information:
    "The Phoenix Indian School," 1988 by Robert Trennert, Jr.
    "Phoenix Indian High School," 1990 by Dorothy R. Parker

  3. 1 Memorial Hall
  4. 2 Band Building
  5. 3 The Circle of Life Fountain
  6. 4 Dining Hall
  7. 5 War Memorial
  8. 6 Indian School Park Pond
  9. 7 Religion
  10. 8 Discipline
  11. 9 American Indian Boarding Schools Haunt Many
  12. 10 American Indian School a Far Cry from the Past
  1. Информация о туре

    In 1890, the Federal Government purchased 160 acres of farmland from a local landowner for $9,000. Federal officials opened the Phoenix Indian School one year later. At its peak in 1935, 900 students attended the school. Among its most popular features were its marching band, which was a frequent participant in local and statewide festivals, and athletic program. The federal government closed the boarding school in 1990.*

    The city of Phoenix was able to obtain the land in 1996 through an intricate three-way land exchange involving the Baron Collier Company and the federal government.The park is named after Horace C. Steele. He founded the Steele Foundation in 1980 to fund charitable, educational, and scientific programs; primarily in Arizona. The Steele foundation donated $2.5 million dollars to start development of the park and in 1997 the Phoenix Parks and Recreation Board approved naming the Park for this successful businessman and philanthropist.The Park opened in November 2001.

    * Sources of historical information:
    "The Phoenix Indian School," 1988 by Robert Trennert, Jr.
    "Phoenix Indian High School," 1990 by Dorothy R. Parker

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  • José luis perez campos

    5 out of 5 rating 07-19-2016

    me gusta mucho