Audio tour

Audio tourStobs Camp

Only in English

2 sights

  1. Audio tour Summary
  2. Audio tour Summary

    For nearly 60 years thousands of young men used the facilities at Stobs Camp near Hawick in the Scottish Borders to train for war. Now the bleak, windswept hills lie as silent witnesses to all that passed before them.

    Stobs Camp has significant historical importance with its quality of remains, intact training ground, massive archaeological potential and huge educational resource. Due to its extraordinary level of preservation Stobs Camp is an internationally important First World War site relating to Scotland’s preparation for war and the subsequent handling of First World War prisoners, both civilian and military.

     

    Directions to the start of the tour

    The nearest postcode is TD9 9UQ but most satellite navigation systems stop you before you have arrived at Stobs. More specifically the entrance into the camp is at grid reference NT 506 100.

    Head south out of Hawick on the B6399 towards Newcastleton. About 4 miles from Hawick you will pass a farm with a waterwheel on your left. Stay on the B6399. You will then pass pig huts in a field on your right and then more pig huts on your left.

    At the next bend in the road you will see a War Memorial on the right hand side.

    Turn right just in front of the War Memorial & head up this single track road.

    You will pass another farm on your right and will then drive under a railway viaduct. Further up you will pass a sign for Stobs Station House (on a gate) on your left. Keep on up the hill.

    You will then emerge from the tree cover.

    Drive over a cattle grid and the car parking area is just on the left. This is marked on the illustration. Park here, but please do not block any roads or tracks.

  3. 1 Stobs Arrival into Camp
  4. 2 Stobs Viaduct
  5. 3 Entrance to the Camp
  6. 4 Procession to cemetery
  7. 5 Cemetery
  8. 6 Stobs, Quartermaster
  9. 7 Drying Hut
  10. 8 WW1 store
  11. 9 Officers Quarters
  12. 10 A view of the camp
  13. 11 Stobs, Fortifications
  14. 12 The road into camp
  1. Audio tour Summary

    For nearly 60 years thousands of young men used the facilities at Stobs Camp near Hawick in the Scottish Borders to train for war. Now the bleak, windswept hills lie as silent witnesses to all that passed before them.

    Stobs Camp has significant historical importance with its quality of remains, intact training ground, massive archaeological potential and huge educational resource. Due to its extraordinary level of preservation Stobs Camp is an internationally important First World War site relating to Scotland’s preparation for war and the subsequent handling of First World War prisoners, both civilian and military.

     

    Directions to the start of the tour

    The nearest postcode is TD9 9UQ but most satellite navigation systems stop you before you have arrived at Stobs. More specifically the entrance into the camp is at grid reference NT 506 100.

    Head south out of Hawick on the B6399 towards Newcastleton. About 4 miles from Hawick you will pass a farm with a waterwheel on your left. Stay on the B6399. You will then pass pig huts in a field on your right and then more pig huts on your left.

    At the next bend in the road you will see a War Memorial on the right hand side.

    Turn right just in front of the War Memorial & head up this single track road.

    You will pass another farm on your right and will then drive under a railway viaduct. Further up you will pass a sign for Stobs Station House (on a gate) on your left. Keep on up the hill.

    You will then emerge from the tree cover.

    Drive over a cattle grid and the car parking area is just on the left. This is marked on the illustration. Park here, but please do not block any roads or tracks.

Reviews

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  • Aldo's Gnome

    5 out of 5 rating 10-12-2018

    A great wee App which really enhances an interesting place to visit - taking away the need to guess what things might've been. Very informative.

  • Oermann, Karl-Heinz

    5 out of 5 rating 08-24-2018

    At the beginning of the First World War my grandfather Wilhelm was 25 years old and he came home at the age of 30. Terrifying how much lifetime the war robbed. During the war, he got chronic rheumatism, so that he could no longer work from 1930 on. He also lost two of his three brothers during the war. He arrived at Stobs on 11 August 1916 following hospitalisation for a bullet wound to his arm. He was later transfered to various places on his way back to Germany.

  • Regina Schimitt

    5 out of 5 rating 08-13-2018

    Excellent, great historical importance

  • Gerry Graham

    5 out of 5 rating 03-13-2018

    Excellent walk, well described, very informative and easy to follow.