Audiotour

AudiotourHistoric Baltimore: Fault Lines and Common Threads

Alleen in het Engels

2 Tourstops

  1. Audiotour overzicht
  2. Audiotour overzicht

    Welcome! We’re so glad you’ve chosen to join us for today’s tour… Fault Lines and Common Threads: exploring Baltimore’s diverse and turbulent history. We know you’re going to enjoy it. This tour is brought to you by ListenUp Audio, a leader in spoken word production since 2010. ListenUp provides the voices for walking tours, audiobooks, podcasts, and more. Visit us at www.listenup.audio. . And now, on with our tour:

    Hi. I’m Kristin and I’ll be your guide. A few notes before we get started. This tour takes approximately an hour and a half to complete. You can stop at any time and start again at the same spot later. If you’d like, you can put your phone in your pocket and just listen from here. I’ll be giving you clear directions and the audio will automatically start playing when you get close to the next point of interest. If a site is closed or your path is blocked, don’t worry. Just go around it. The tour will pick up at the next location. And this is important: PLEASE make sure you stay aware of your surroundings at all times and obey all traffic signals.

    Okay, I think we’re ready to get started. Take a look around. You should be standing at 21 S Eutaw St. You are? Then let’s begin!

    Welcome to Baltimore, the “Greatest City in America,” as our bus-stop benches proclaim. The benches capture the city’s paradoxes: spectacular ambitions and spectacular failures; great diversity and great inequality; economic struggles and artistic flourishing. All this history is out in the open, as easy to spot as a “Greatest City in America” bench, if you know where to look.

    You’re standing in the city’s old commercial district, where Baltimoreans have converged for business and entertainment since the 1700s. To the south you can spot the masts of tall ships anchored in the harbor, which opens out to the Chesapeake Bay. This waterway made Baltimore a center of agriculture and trade and a seat of power and wealth.

    Workers from all over lent their muscle to Baltimore’s industrial growth. Immigrants arrived throughout the 19th century from Western and Eastern Europe. The nation’s largest community of free blacks lived here before the Civil War. After Abolition, former slaves came north to join them, building the ships and railroads that channeled wealth into the city. Uniquely positioned on the fault line between north and south, Baltimore became a town where diverse populations lived side-by-side in increasingly scarce housing. By the turn of the 20th century, much-needed laborers were crammed into alleyway slums.

    Deep-seated racism and discriminatory policies soon drained the prosperity out of inner-city neighborhoods. As successive ethnic and racial groups gained wealth, they took it with them on an exodus to the suburbs. In the decades after World War II, major industries like steel and shipbuilding began to move overseas. From one million residents in the 1950s, Baltimore’s population declined to roughly 600,000 residents today. Thousands of buildings were left vacant.

    Attempts to redevelop and revitalize the city came and went. Some left scars that remain on the landscape, like the 1970s “Highway to Nowhere” that sliced apart a neighborhood. The strongest force for healing has welled up from Baltimore’s grassroots. Today’s community leaders, youth, artists, and activists lead a growing movement to build a city that sustains and nurtures its residents. They’re strengthening the common thread of creative labor that has always run through Baltimore’s diverse populations.

    This walk will guide you through Baltimore’s downtown commercial corridor, past the city’s oldest farmer’s market, through the green space and religious landmarks of Seton Hill, and into Mount Vernon, home to 19th-century high society and currently a destination for arts and culture. Walking is the best way to encounter Baltimore -- it’s a patchwork city with vastly different conditions on every block. Much of its history is hidden in plain sight, and we’re here to investigate the rich stories behind the facades.

    Photo “Baltimore City Hall from Northeast.jpg” by Steelplug is licensed under Public Domain

  3. 1 Tour Start - Bromo Seltzer Tower
  4. 2 Davidge Hall, College of Medicine of Maryland and National Museum of Dentistry
  5. 3 Westminster Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
  6. 4 G. Krug & Sons Ironworks and Museum
  7. 5 St. Mary's Seminal Chapel and Mother Seton House
  8. 6 Orchard St. Church
  9. 7 A.T. Jones and Sons Costume Company
  10. 8 Enoch Pratt House and Maryland Historical Society
  11. 9 Washington Monument And Roger Taney Monument
  12. 10 Peabody Library and Peabody Conservatory
  13. 11 Walters Art Museum
  14. 12 Grimaldis Gallery
  1. Audiotour overzicht

    Welcome! We’re so glad you’ve chosen to join us for today’s tour… Fault Lines and Common Threads: exploring Baltimore’s diverse and turbulent history. We know you’re going to enjoy it. This tour is brought to you by ListenUp Audio, a leader in spoken word production since 2010. ListenUp provides the voices for walking tours, audiobooks, podcasts, and more. Visit us at www.listenup.audio. . And now, on with our tour:

    Hi. I’m Kristin and I’ll be your guide. A few notes before we get started. This tour takes approximately an hour and a half to complete. You can stop at any time and start again at the same spot later. If you’d like, you can put your phone in your pocket and just listen from here. I’ll be giving you clear directions and the audio will automatically start playing when you get close to the next point of interest. If a site is closed or your path is blocked, don’t worry. Just go around it. The tour will pick up at the next location. And this is important: PLEASE make sure you stay aware of your surroundings at all times and obey all traffic signals.

    Okay, I think we’re ready to get started. Take a look around. You should be standing at 21 S Eutaw St. You are? Then let’s begin!

    Welcome to Baltimore, the “Greatest City in America,” as our bus-stop benches proclaim. The benches capture the city’s paradoxes: spectacular ambitions and spectacular failures; great diversity and great inequality; economic struggles and artistic flourishing. All this history is out in the open, as easy to spot as a “Greatest City in America” bench, if you know where to look.

    You’re standing in the city’s old commercial district, where Baltimoreans have converged for business and entertainment since the 1700s. To the south you can spot the masts of tall ships anchored in the harbor, which opens out to the Chesapeake Bay. This waterway made Baltimore a center of agriculture and trade and a seat of power and wealth.

    Workers from all over lent their muscle to Baltimore’s industrial growth. Immigrants arrived throughout the 19th century from Western and Eastern Europe. The nation’s largest community of free blacks lived here before the Civil War. After Abolition, former slaves came north to join them, building the ships and railroads that channeled wealth into the city. Uniquely positioned on the fault line between north and south, Baltimore became a town where diverse populations lived side-by-side in increasingly scarce housing. By the turn of the 20th century, much-needed laborers were crammed into alleyway slums.

    Deep-seated racism and discriminatory policies soon drained the prosperity out of inner-city neighborhoods. As successive ethnic and racial groups gained wealth, they took it with them on an exodus to the suburbs. In the decades after World War II, major industries like steel and shipbuilding began to move overseas. From one million residents in the 1950s, Baltimore’s population declined to roughly 600,000 residents today. Thousands of buildings were left vacant.

    Attempts to redevelop and revitalize the city came and went. Some left scars that remain on the landscape, like the 1970s “Highway to Nowhere” that sliced apart a neighborhood. The strongest force for healing has welled up from Baltimore’s grassroots. Today’s community leaders, youth, artists, and activists lead a growing movement to build a city that sustains and nurtures its residents. They’re strengthening the common thread of creative labor that has always run through Baltimore’s diverse populations.

    This walk will guide you through Baltimore’s downtown commercial corridor, past the city’s oldest farmer’s market, through the green space and religious landmarks of Seton Hill, and into Mount Vernon, home to 19th-century high society and currently a destination for arts and culture. Walking is the best way to encounter Baltimore -- it’s a patchwork city with vastly different conditions on every block. Much of its history is hidden in plain sight, and we’re here to investigate the rich stories behind the facades.

    Photo “Baltimore City Hall from Northeast.jpg” by Steelplug is licensed under Public Domain

Beoordelingen

A minimum rating of 1 star is required.
Please fill in your name.
  • Alex

    4 out of 5 rating 03-27-2016

    interesting, but needs more carefull logistics. some stories overlap, in other places large gaps of silence present